.

.

Month-by-Month in North Florida: What to Plant in March (UPDATED FOR 2017)



This is one of our prime planting times in North Florida, the time when we plant most of what people consider summer annuals and vegetables. There are still a few hardier winter crops you can plant, but
I try to get those into the ground as early in the month as possible.

Since there are so many entries for this month, I've made a separate list of those vegetables where March is the absolute last month to plant them. Try to get them into the ground early if you're planting from seed.

Annuals to plant in March in North Florida 

Your cool weather annuals will probably thrive for another month or so if the temps don't get too high, but consider adding some of the warmer season annuals now as well. Check out your local garden centers to see what they are offering.

Angelonia Coleus Cosmos Marigold Zinnia

Bulbs to plant in March in North Florida:


Looking for some beautiful summer blooms? These bulbs will provide that, and cannas and gingers can also provide lovely foliage. You can also plant edible gingers, such as common ginger and turmeric, this month. They grow well in containers, but be sure to have a container large enough for them to spread.

Canna Dahlia Gloriosa lilies Ginger


Last Chance to Plant These Vegetables


While eggplants and peppers are known to be good summer crops in North Florida, the seeds need to be planted by the end of this month, because they need cooler temps to germinate. You can purchase and plant starts later, but I recommend not past April, because they need a chance to establish themselves before the hot weather hits.

Arugula Carrots Eggplant Kohlrabi
Onions, Bunching Peas, Snow or
English
Peppers Radish
Spinach

Vegetables to Plant in North Florida in March



It's time to plant some of those veggies that will survive our summers now so they can grow strong enough to survive the heat. If you love your summer watermelons, they go into the ground this month as well.


Beans Cantaloupe Corn Cucumbers
Okra Peas, SouthernSweet Potatoes Squash, Summer
Squash, Winter Swiss Chard TomatoesWatermelon

Lots of possibilities this month to get in a last planting of a few of those cool weather crops and start your warm weather crops.  If you don't want to garden in the summer, southern peas make a great nitrogen-fixing cover crop that is easy-care and can be tilled under in the fall -- after you harvest all those lovely peas, of course.

Happy Gardening!

0 comments :